Frequently Asked Questions

If a client came to us asking us for advice about leaving her husband we would get paid to write back with one answer.   If they  paid us for a short answer they would not get a long answer. They have paid us to do this but we would not end up becoming a penfriend who constantly monitors how the situation is changing, that would mean we are giving them hours of our time for the price of a few minutes.   So why would we put so much time into a person who is not a paying client?  Our clients are our bread and butter, not those who hope to work for us.  We have already spent money on checking your comments and that might be a big loss for us.  If someone is supposedly wise enough to do this job they ought to be wise enough to monitor their own progress without input from us.  But if they want our input too they can invest in the very cheap lesson and/or they can have 1 2 1 consultations with us by email if they pay for them.

 

When YOU become a professional you will see what we mean.  you can easily give away free time and freee advice to lots of people. But that does not cover your costs or give you any wages...and people are always eager when it is free, they think twice when it costs them.

 

Charlotte left school at 15 with nolqualifications at all.  She became a paid advisor beca\use people kept asking her for free help and she had to make sure people did not help themselveds to her time. At one stage people would just turn upoon her doorstep expecting to walk in and stgay for as long as they wanted for free guidance and then leave.  It did not occur to them that she would be busy with paid work, eating, in the bath, relaxing or doing somethign where it was an intrusion or inconvenient.  Asking people nicely to only come at certain times did not work.  Asking people nicely to contribute a little to pay for her time did not usually work. So she started to charge a per hour fee, and this did work because she was so popular. It kept away some of the people but that was good, there were too many.

 

Remember that many forums are seeking free voluntary help and they monitor your progress but they do not inform you of what they think, they only contact you if and when they want you and then they offer you the chance to work for them totally free with no wages.  We pay our staff so we have to monitor who they give time to.  We are hardly going to give clients only so many words and so many minutes if they pay and then give a lot more time to the people who do not pay.  By rights we should be annoyed with you for wasting our time because it has cost us money to monitor your postings when you were not suitable.

 

There is a website called SELFGROWTH which says they will help you to set up a business or become a better advisor and they currently charge £350 per hour for their advice with no guarantee of any results at the end of it.  After all, you might be totally unsuitable because you do not have the necessary talents or personality to do it, but they will still happily charge you £350 per hour to discuss this with you.  We give much of what we do totally free of charge but if you also want our 1 2 1 professional expertise you must pay for it,  and it is a damn site cheaper than it is at SELFGROWTH.  We specialise in this whereas they do all sorts of things including psychic, therapy and more so their advice and help would be far more vague and less specific.  We also offer advice on how to set up a successful business and run it, otherwise what is the point to having a skill you can sell if you do not know how to sell.

 

YOU are the only one who knows how genuine and skilled you are. We hope you are and we hope to see you posting and posting so that we can recognise your talents, see that you have at least five hours a week to spare and offer you a job.  This is all up to you.  YOu can also be listed so that normal clients can consult you and you have the opportunity of being recognised by a website or magazine who are seeking someone like you to employ.

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Go to Home     charlotte craig